Tue. Nov 12th, 2019

LilMike.Me Vidiocracy

@LilMikeSF Media Maker Myriorama

Remembering Alan Turing : The Man Who Cracked The Nazi Code

Alan Turing played a key role in breaking German Enigma codes in World War II via his Turing machine, and also contributed to the invention of what we now call the computer and predicted the fundamentals of what we now call Artificial Intelligence

The day after the anniversary of D-Day also marks a less remembered event, it marks the anniversary of brilliant mathematician Alan Turing’s death in 1954. The unsung hero of the Allied Forces ability to crack Nazi Enigma machine codes and whose work helped enable D-Day invasion, died a decade after the war, of an apparent cyanide suicide at age 41 . At the time of his passing, Turing, already “chemically castrated” by the UK authorities, was facing yer another trial over his unacceptable propensity for homosexuality after a man was found in his home. The  NY Times marks the anniversary with a recap of the troubled father of modern computing’s life and accomplishments as part of a series of obituaries on overlooked people whose deaths weren’t contemporaneously noted.

Turing’s story is now recounted in films, and he even received a posthumous pardon from the Queen not long ago, but it all comes too late in a world that seemingly did not appreciate what he had to offer during his lifetime. Turing came up with the fundamental conceptual workings behind Artificial Intelligence, had influence on modern encryption and cryptography, of course changed history by helping crack German military codes with his Turing machine, and is generally thought of to have been the father of the digital computer age.

Listen To Part One Of A BBC Programme Of Turing’s Early Years

Part Two of BBC Audio Programme on Alan Turing’s Legacy

Here is a movie about Turing’s war time computational heroics that is free to stream for Amazon Prime Members…and available to rent otherwise

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